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Bail Bonds in Jones County, NC


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Bail bonds

In its essence, a bail bond is a sort of promise that you are going to show up at your court hearing at the date specified. In return, you will be permitted to remain free even though you are still awaiting trial for a criminal or civil charge. Without a bail bond, you will sit in prison while waiting for the court to rule on either conviction or acquittal. A bondsman can pay bail for you and get you out of prison.

Depending on the charge, the cost of bail can be steep. Few accuseds have the ability to post the bail. There's a reason why the correctional system is overloaded. However, there's a legal manner in which to earn your temporary release even while your lawsuit is on-going. With our site you can find a reputable bail bondsman in Jones County.

Why does a judge impose a bail bond ?

The legal system permits the services of a bondsman to post a bail bond, also called surety bond, to help an accused get temporary freedom while waiting for their court hearing.

The judicial system allows two types of bail bond-- a criminal bail bond and a civil bail bond.

To be clear, a judge does not impose a criminal bail bond to punish you for your supposed crime. You are still presumed innocent up until proven guilty. Having said that, the judge needs to have a guarantee that you will show up at trial to face your accuser; thus, the requirement to post bail. If you show up at all your scheduled criminal proceedings as required, and you are eventually acquitted, the bail will be repaid to you. In case you are condemned, the bail will be used to take care of the fines and penalties that the judge might enforce on you. If you skip the court hearings, the bail will be forfeited and you will be subject to arrest.

The same justification holds with civil bail bonds. The bail imposed on civil cases works as a guarantee or a surety that the offender will have the ability to pay the fines and penalties that the judge can enforce on the offender after the trial.

Should I hire a bail bondsman?

If you are able to put up bail by yourself, you don't need to have to work with a bondsman. For one, they ask a small fee for their assistance, in addition to the collateral you have to provide for what is certainly categorized as a loan.

In almost all states, the bail bondsman will charge a fee of around 10-20% of the overall amount of the bail. You can't get this money back even if you are cleared of the charge. However, you don't need to bother with submitting the paperwork or have to deal with court staff since the bail bondsman will take care of all that . Secondly, you will have a better prospect of having your bail request accepted because of the reputation of the bail bondsman alone. Third, as a result of their experience with the process, you can possibly be out of prison in a couple of hours.

Lastly, the bonding company knows the importance of a good first impression while appearing in court. If you are committed to the local or federal jail, you will be hauled to court in the official inmate's uniform. In contrast, when you made bail, you are able to dress smartly and ensure a good first impression on the court.

How does the bail bonds process work?

To begin the bail bonds procedure, you first have to find a bail bondsman. You can do that in person, over the phone and even online. Given the stringent adherence to professionalism, a bail bondsman will gladly walk you through the bail procedure and iron out any reservations that you might have.

Time is of the essence throughout this process. Once the bail agent answered all of your concerns to your complete satisfaction, the bail bondsman will deal with all of the formalities needed to get you or your loved one released from prison.

To make sure all goes smoothly, a bail bondsman needs to know the defendant's name, birthdate, and the location or city of the arrest. With this information, the agent will have the ability to gather additional details from the prison system needed to secure the release. After dealing with all the procedures, the bondsman will go over to the jail to get the accused out.

Using a bondsman to bail out yourself or someone you know is that simple, you can be out of prison and reunited with your loved ones in a few hours.

Information your bondsman needs

If you speak to a bondsman, you need to share the following details:

  • Your full name if you are the offender
  • The name and location of the jailhouse where the suspect is detained
  • The booking number in the police blotter
  • The complaints filed against the offender
  • Any extra relevant information

Will the bondsman need collateral ?

If a bondsman will want collateral for will vary between cases, but it is a common practice in the industry. Regarding the kind of collateral that is acceptable, the list is just too long to mention all. Suffice to say that if a bondsman thinks that something has value, it can be used as collateral. Listed below are just a couple of examples:

  • House or property
  • Cars, boats, yachts
  • Jewelry or gems
  • Shares, stocks or equities
  • Bank accounts
  • TV, appliances or other electronics
  • Antiques or art collections
  • Farm equipment

And if available, you can also make use of payment plans provided by a bail bondsman.

If you or a friend run the risk of staying in prison for quite some time because you can not raise the amount of money, a bail bondsman is the only alternative that is left. On our site you can look for a bonding company in Jones County. Many of them are open day and night.


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