Bail Bonds in Connecticut


Connecticut Bail Bonds Group

11 Asylum St, Suite 512
Hartford, CT 06103

(860) 420-2245
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Connecticut Bail Bonds Group of New Haven CT

7 Elm St, Fl 2
New Haven, CT 06510

(203) 663-3338
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Bail bonds

When a person is put behind bars and booked for a major criminal offense, they should wait in jail till a bail hearing. It is during this bail hearing that the judge sets the bail amount. If that individual can't raise the amount, they have to remain in jail until their court hearing. However that does not always need to hold true; they can also look for the services of a bondsman.

Regrettably, many people end up remaining in jail until their court date since most do not have a large amount of money available in the bank.

Our website will assist you with bailing out your loved ones by connecting you to credible and inexpensive bail bond agents in Connecticut.

Why does a judge impose a bail bond ?

The law allows the services of a bondsman to post a bail bond, also referred to as surety bond, to help an offender gain temporary freedom while awaiting their court hearing.

The law allows two sorts of bail -- a criminal bail bond as well as a civil bail bond.

To be clear, a court does not impose a criminal bail bond to penalize you for your supposed criminal offense. You are still innocent up until proven guilty. That being said, the court requires an assurance that you will show up at trial to face your accuser; thus, the need to post bail. If you show up at all your arranged criminal procedures as promised, and you are eventually found not guilty, the bail will be given back to you. In the case that you are found guilty, the bail amount will be used to take care of the fines and penalties that the judge may enforce on you. When you skip the court appearances, your bail will be lost and you will be subject to getting arrested.

The same reasoning applies to civil bail bonds. The bail imposed on civil cases functions as an assurance or a surety that the defendant will have the ability to pay the fines and penalties that the judge may require from the defendant after the trial.

How beneficial is a bail bond?

A bondsman is your best opportunity to not spend considerable time in prison in case you don't have enough money available to post your bail. A bail bond company usually requires a non-refundable rate of 10% of the bail amount. That is no more than reasonable, looking at the risk the bonding company is taking in providing the bail bond. In any case, the most pressing concern is to get you out of prison, and for that to happen you need to find a trustworthy bondsman in your area.

An agreement with a bail bondsman is also handy given that the latter will facilitate your release from prison, simplifying a complex judicial process. You can simply reach out to a bondsman who can provide you a deal and request you to provide the needed info about yourself, or somebody you would like to bail out. In case you accept the contract, you can simply sit tight and wait for the bonding company to put up the bail on your behalf.

Needless to say you still have to be at your trial. But now that you're free on a bond, you can show up in court in civilian clothes. When you had stayed in jail because you could not afford to put up bail, you would show up in court in a prison uniform-- and that does not make a good impression. A bail bondsman allows you to make a decent appearance in the courtroom, which really matters a whole lot given that first impressions matter.

How does the bail bonds process work?

To begin the bail bonds procedure, you first have to get a bail agent. You can do that in person, over the phone and even via the internet. Given the strict adherence to professionalism, a bail bondsman will happily walk you through the bail bond process and iron out any reservations that you might have.

Time is of the essence during this process. When the bail bondsman addressed all of your questions to your satisfaction, the bail agent will deal with all of the procedures vital to get you or your loved one released from jail.

To make certain all goes smoothly, a bail bondsman needs to have the accused's name, birthdate, and the location or city of the arrest. With this info, the bail bondsman will have the ability to gather additional details from the jail system required to secure the release. After managing all the formalities, the bondsman will go over to the prison to get the accused out.

Utilizing a bonding company to bail out yourself or somebody you love is that easy, you can be out of prison and reunited with your loved ones in a few hours.

Going to meet with a bondsman?

You need to have the following details on hand when speaking with the bail bondsman:

  • The suspect's name
  • The prison, city, and county where the suspect is held
  • The offender's booking number
  • The charges against the offender
  • The amount of the bail bond

What is accepted as collateral?

In most cases, the bail bondsman will ask for collateral with the deal. This is understandable, taking into consideration the risks that are involved. An inmate is a possible flight risk, and there have been plenty of occasions where a bail bondsman needed to hire a bounty hunter to recover the fleeing offender.

But what is acceptable as collateral? Basically, when a bail bondsman considers something valuable, you are able to use it as a guarantee for the bond. Below are a couple of examples:

  • Real estate
  • Autos
  • Equities
  • Jewelry
  • Electronics
  • Bank accounts
  • Visa or mastercard

If you have trouble paying for the bail bond, bonding companies often offer payment options that you can make use of. Simply talk to the bail bondsman to determine what option is best suited with regard to your situation.

You can use our site to look for a bondsman that will be perfect for you. Most of them are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, ready to assist you or a family member to spend the as little time as possible in jail.


Cities in Connecticut

Counties in Connecticut